Practice Tests

Numerical Reasoning Test

The numerical reasoning test highlights the candidate's ability to quickly grasp numerical concepts, solve mathematical problems and make sound and logical decisions, using numbers and any other given information.


It is important to note that the purpose of the numerical reasoning test is to determine the candidate's ability to interpret information provided only in the test statement, often presented in table or graph form, and not to measure his/her previous knowledge and mathematical capacities. Being "good" or "mediocre" in mathematics therefore has no influence on the final score.

Even so, in order to increase your chances of scoring higher than other candidates, we highly recommend practicing tests of this type in advance, in order to gain speed and familiarize yourself with the necessary thinking mode.

The Different Types of Numerical Reasoning Tests

Numerical reasoning tests can take many forms and often constitute an important part of recruitment tests.

  1. Numeracy test: basic and advanced numeracy
  2. Numerical reasoning test: tables and graphs
  3. Advanced or critical numerical reasoning test
  4. Rust Advanced Numerical Reasoning Appraisal (RANRA)

For What Purposes is the Numerical Reasoning Test Used?

The numerical reasoning test is often included in job recruitment processes by employers looking to fill positions involving various levels of responsibility. It targets candidates for managerial positions as well as those wishing to pursue a professional career in national and international companies. Possible positions include:

  • Officers, directors and managers
  • Senior executives
  • Accountants
  • Bankers and analysts
  • Students and recent graduates
  • Product manager
  • Area Manager

Numeracy Test

Numeracy tests are amongst the most basic and widely used numerical reasoning tests used in recruitment centres. In this type of test, the candidate is assessed on his mental computational ability, based on his/her ability to solve mathematical problems and other simple quantitative exercises in a given time. Numeracy tests are divided into two categories: basic and advanced numeracy.

Learn more on the next page dedicated to this type of test.

Numerical Reasoning Test

Numerical reasoning tests include exercises comprised of statistical data presented in graphs and tables, accompanied by a text passage and followed by one or more questions.

Practice and develop your ability to understand and manipulate numerical information, in all its forms. Learn how to solve numerical reasoning and sequences exercises and how to solve exercises including tables and graphs. 49 numerical reasoning tests online!

Graphs and Tables

Graphs are used to present the relationship between numerical data and non-numerical parameters, expressed as two variables:

  • The abscissa (horizontal X-axis), which usually represents time, in units such as years, hours, minutes etc.
  • The ordinate (vertical Y-axis) represents the variables of the graph as a function of the abscissa (time). Such variables include quantity, temperature, inflation rate, etc.

The types of graphs most commonly used by test publishers are:

  • Curve graphs: evolution of a curve as a function of time.
  • Air graphs: similar to the curve graph in that it highlights the magnitude or amplitude of the variations rather than the elapsed time.
  • Histogram: vertical bars separated by categories. Histograms are well suited for presenting amounts or quantities in equal time intervals.

Example of a Numerical Test Question with a Graph from SHL

Example of a Numerical Test Question with a Graph from SHL
SHL
Question 1

In year 3, how much more did Germany spend on computer imports than Italy?

  1. 650 million
  2. 700 million
  3. 750 million
  4. 800 million
  5. 850 million

Answer

The correct answer is B: 700 million.

Question 2

If the amount spent on computer imports into the United Kingdom in the fifth year was 20% lower than in the fourth year, how much was spent in the fifth year?

  1. 1080 million
  2. 1120 million
  3. 1160 million
  4. 1220 million
  5. 1300 million

Answer

The correct answer is B: 1120 million.

Example of an Exercise with a Graph from cut-e scales Numerical Test

Example of an Exercise with a Graph from cut-e scales Numerical Test
cut-e scales Numerical

Tables and graphs are used to represent numerical data visually. Tables are useful due to the possibility of including many parameters, whereas typical graphs allow the use of only two variables. Thus, exercises with tables will often be more complex and their interpretation will require more effort.

The various types of tables you may come across in numerical tests are:

  • Demographic statistics tables
  • Tables with percentages or ratios
  • Tables presenting financial data: profits, margins, growth rates, profitability, etc.

Example of an Exercise with a Table from SHL

Lectorat des journaux
Journaux quotidiensLectorat (millions)Pourcentage d'adultes lisant chaque journal la 3ème année
Année 1Année 2HommesFemmes
The Daily Chronicle3.62.976
Daily News13.89.32418
The Tribune1.11.443
The Herald8.512.7323
Daily Echo4.84.91012
Question 1

Which newspaper was read by a higher percentage of women than men in the third year?

  • The Tribune
  • The Herald
  • Daily News
  • Daily Echo
  • The Daily Chronicle

Answer

The correct answer is B: The Herald.

Question 2

What was the combined readership of the Daily Chronicle, Daily Echo and Tribune in the first year?

  • 10.6
  • 8.4
  • 9.5
  • 12.2
  • 7.8

Answer

The correct answer is C: 9,5.

Advanced or Critical Numerical Reasoning Test

The so-called "advanced" or "critical" numerical reasoning tests may differ from the basic numerical tests in several parameters:

  • The exercises are more complex.
  • Include phrases intended to confuse the reader.
  • Necessitate more calculation steps than would a basic exercise.
  • Include multiple graphs and tables requiring data aggregation (rather than a single tool providing all the information).
  • Numeracy exercises included in the calculation steps.
  • Inclusion of specific vocabulary (e.g. financial terms).
  • Require familiarity with a calculator's various functions, so as not to waste precious time.

Rust Advanced Numerical Reasoning Appraisal (RANRA)

The Rust Advanced Numerical Reasoning Test (RANRA) is a test published by Pearson TalentLens, aimed at executives, managers and recent graduates. RANRA, which is not a commonly used numerical test, tests the candidate's ability to deduce, analyze and interpret, combined with everyday problems. The test is thus designed to assess the superior cognitive abilities of candidates. This test is equivalent to the Watson-Glaser test, which is also an advanced-level critical verbal reasoning test, often required for the same position types as RANRA. The particularity of the Rust Advanced Numerical Reasoning test is its focus on the following categories:

  • Data sufficiency (data sufficiency)
  • Quantity comparison

Our partner offers 3000+ practice questions, similar to those in the RANRA test, including tests of a similar structure.

Recognizing data sufficiency issues

As a general rule, the candidate is offered two statements followed by a question, which may be accompanied by additional information. It is then up to him to decide whether the information provided in the proposed statements is sufficient in order to answer the initial question.

The answers you will come across in data sufficiency exercises are constant; for each question you will have to pick one of five set proposals:

  1. Assertion 1 is sufficient to answer the question asked, but not assertion 2.
  2. Assertion 2 is sufficient to answer the question asked, but not assertion 1.
  3. The two statements together are sufficient to answer the question asked, but neither statement 1 alone nor statement 2 alone is sufficient.
  4. Each statement alone is sufficient to answer the question asked.
  5. The two statements are not sufficient to answer the question asked; additional information is needed.

Familiarity with these five proposals in advance will allow you to not to waste time on data sufficiency questions and thus increase your chances of success. Although these kinds of exercises may seem simple at first glance, they are in fact complex and extremely confusing. It is important to follow a certain set of guidelines that will be the same for all questions of this type. These can be divided into several steps:

  • The first step is to evaluate each of the statements separately, to see if they answer the question. If one or the other is sufficient but the other is not, you may narrow your options to answers A or B. If each is sufficient on their own, answer D will be the one to choose.
  • If neither of the two statements is sufficient on its own, the second step will be to check whether the combination of the two statements are sufficient to answer the exercise. If this is the case, the correct answer will be C. If not, i.e. if the proposed statements are insufficient, the answer to check will be E.

Example from Pearson

Sean is worth his weight in gold. What is his weight?

  • Sean is lighter than his brothers and sisters.
  • One of Sean's sisters weighs 82 kilograms.
    1. Assertion 1 is sufficient to answer the question asked, but not assertion 2.
    2. Assertion 2 is sufficient to answer the question asked, but not assertion 1.
    3. The two statements together are sufficient to answer the question asked, but neither statement 1 alone nor statement 2 alone is sufficient.
    4. Each statement alone is sufficient to answer the question asked.
    5. The two statements are not sufficient to answer the question asked; additional information is needed.

    Answer and explanation

    The correct answer is E: The two statements are not sufficient to answer the question asked; additional information is needed.

    Statement 1 provides information only about Sean's weight in relation to his brothers and sisters. Statement 2 provides information regarding the weight of one of his sisters. Therefore, the information provided in the statements does not provide an answer to the question asked, neither separately nor combined, and the correct answer is therefore E – "the two statements are not sufficient to answer the question asked; additional information is needed". (The fact that Sean is worth his weight in gold is irrelevant).

    Tips and Tricks

    • Do not try to solve the question by calculations, this is a waste of time and will not assist you in arriving at the correct answers.
    • Firstly, check if the question concerns one or more values. Remember that you only check if you have enough data.
    • Avoid making decisions based only on the geometric shape proposed in the statement; it is probably not to scale and is for guidance only.
    • Try to simplify the proposed statement as much as possible. It will often be described in a complicated way, but if you are able to understand what is really being asked of you, it will make the exercise much easier.
    • Don't wait until the last minute to start training for numerical reasoning tests, prepare in advance with the online tests provided by our exclusive partner.

    Quantity Comparison

    Quantity comparison questions appear in both the GRE and RANRA tests. The questions focus on everyday situations and require prior mathematical knowledge at the high school level and a high quality of understanding and financial and numerical reasoning. The topics covered are:

    • Algebra: mathematical operations such as equations and inequalities, relationships between algebraic functions, conversion of measurements and units, percentages and ratios, etc.
    • Arithmetic: basic arithmetic functions such as integrals, fractions, roots and exponents, etc.
    • Geometry: geometry of coordinates, properties of basic geometric shapes (triangles, circles, diamonds, rectangles etc.), Pythagorean theorem, etc.
    • Data analysis: basic statistical knowledge - median, probabilities, boxplot and other types of graphs, variables, ratios, etc.
    • Mechanics: speed, time, distance, acceleration, etc.

    How Are the Quantity Comparison Questions Presented?

    In questions of this kind, the candidate is asked to compare two quantities - quantity A and quantity B. He/she must then determine which of the following proposals describes the relationship between quantities A and B:

    • Quantity A is greater than quantity B.
    • Quantity B is greater than quantity A.
    • The two quantities are equal.
    • The relationship between the two quantities cannot be determined based on the information provided.

    Example from Pearson

    Quantity A: The price of 2 kilograms of sugar at 46 pounds per kilogram.
    Quantity B: The price of 3 kilograms of sugar at 31 pounds per kilogram.

    • Quantity A is greater than quantity B.
    • Quantity B is greater than quantity A.
    • The two quantities are equal.
    • The relationship between the two quantities cannot be determined based on the information provided. 

    Answer and explanation

    Two kilograms of sugar at 46 pounds per kilogram costs 2 x 46 pounds = 92 pounds.
    Three kilograms of sugar at 31 pounds costs 3 x 31 pounds = 93 pounds.
    Since 93 pounds is greater than 92 pounds, quantity B is greater and therefore the correct answer is B "Quantity B is greater than quantity A".

    Tips and Tricks

    1. Become familiar with the answers! As is the case with data sufficiency questions, the options are constant and will be the same for every question. You should pay extra attention to the last choice; "the relationship between the two quantities cannot be determined based on the information provided". Never select this option if it is clear that the values of both quantities can be determined by calculations. In addition, if you think that one of the two quantities is superior to the other, pay close attention to be sure you select the right choice and do not confuse between the two.
    2. Avoid overly complicated calculations if possible; do not waste time trying to calculate the exact quantities. You should attempt to simplify, transform or estimate their values with the least amount of calculation necessary.
    3. Remember that the geometric shapes in the questions are not necessarily drawn to scale; do not rely on the illustrations provided with the statements.
    4. Try to replace the variables with numbers; if one of the two quantities is an algebraic expression, replace it with numbers that are easy to compare. Try several categories of numbers (positive, negative, zero, decimal, fractions) before deciding. If in one case, a certain quantity is larger than the other but, in another case, vice versa, the last answer is the one to choose.

    In order to solve RANRA exercises, it is necessary to persevere. Although the first questions you attempt to answer may seem complicated, with a little training and by following the strategies we provide, you will be able to solve them in a more efficient manner.

    The Main Test Publishers of Numerical Reasoning Tests

    All test publishers offer digital aptitude tests especially designed and adapted for different professions, aiming to determine the potential and suitability of candidates and employees for each. Learn more about each of them below:

    Test PublishersAssessment Tools
    SHLVerify Calculations
    SHLVerify Numerical Reasoning
    CubiksVerify Numerical Reasoning
    CubiksLogiks Général
    cut-e (AON)Calculs (scales eql)
    cut-e (AON)Raisonnement numérique
    (scales numerical admin)
    cut-e (AON)Raisonnement numérique
    (scales numerical consumer)
    cut-e (AON)Raisonnement numérique
    (scales numerical finance)
    cut-e (AON)Raisonnement numérique industry)
    (scales numerical industry)
    cut-e (AON)Capacité de calcul
    (scales tmt)
    Thomas InternationalTest d'Intelligence globale (TIG)
    Thomas InternationalThomas General Intelligence Test (GIA)
    Saville ConsultingSwift Analyse
    Saville ConsultingSwift Compréhension
    IBM KenexaElements Numerical
    IBM KenexaAspects General Numerical
    PsytechCritical Reasoning Test Battery
    (CRTB2)
    OPC assessmentCore Skills Numerical Test
    (CoreN)
    OPC assessmentGeneral Numerical Practice Test
    (NPT)
    OPC assessmentProfessional Numerical Reasoning Test (PNRT)
    RevelianNumerical Reasoning Test
    TazioNumerical Reasoning Test
    Pearson TalentLensNumerical Data Interpretation Test™ (NDIT)
    Pearson TalentLensDifferential Aptitude Tests (DAT)
    PSYNumerical Reasoning Test
    CappNumerical Reasoning Test
    EPSO (Prometric)
    Administrateurs (AD)
    Assistants (AST)
    Numerical Reasoning Test
    The Predictive IndexPI Cognitive Assessment
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